Different ecological relationship among organisms for kids

Ecological interactions (article) | Ecology | Khan Academy

different ecological relationship among organisms for kids

Animals rely on each other, too. Some have lifelong relationships with other organisms, called symbiotic relationships. There are three different types of. Apr 5, Different animals species help each other hunt, clean and protect themselves from predators. to get things they both want, a phenomenon called "symbiotic relationships." Here are some of the coolest animal friendships we discovered. . Clowns on a mission: Making wishes come true for sick children. Crittercam's goal is to help researchers understand the day-to-day lives and ecological relationships of different species. Scientists fit wild animals with a GPS .

These interactions may have positive, negative or neutral effects on either species' ability to survive and reproduce, or "fitness. One Wins, One Loses Predation includes any interaction between two species in which one species benefits by obtaining resources from and to the detriment of the other. While it's most often associated with the classic predator-prey interaction, in which one species kills and consumes another, not all predation interactions result in the death of one organism. In the case of herbivory, a herbivore often consumes only part of the plant.

While this action may result in injury to the plant, it may also result in seed dispersal. Many ecologists include parasitic interactions in discussions of predation.

Ecological interactions

In such relationships, the parasite causes harm to the host over time, possibly even death. As an example, parasitic tapeworms attach themselves to the intestinal lining of dogs, humans and other mammals, consuming partially digested food and depriving the host of nutrients, thus lowering the host's fitness.

different ecological relationship among organisms for kids

The Double Negative Competition exists when multiple organisms vie for the same, limiting resource. When you don't get any fruit you die. That's just the way nature works. It could go the other way though. If I kill all of the trees with the high fruit and only low fruit is left, you win.

Relationships among Organisms - SAS

Competition usually happens when you have a limited amount of resources. There is one important idea to remember. Sometimes no one wins. Sometimes if everything is even it can be a stalemate and both species compete, but both survive.

Imagine if we are different species, but have the same skills. No one would be a winner in that case.

Relationships Between Organisms

Mutualism The heart of mutualism is that two species live together in harmony. Both species receive an advantage by working with the other. More importantly, it helps them both survive.

different ecological relationship among organisms for kids

The prey animal tries to avoid being eaten by hiding, fleeing, or defending itself using various adaptations and strategies. These could be the camouflage of an octopus or a fawn, the fast speed of a jackrabbit or impala, or the sting of a bee or spines of a sea urchin.

If the prey is not successful, it becomes a meal and energy source for the predator. If the prey is successful and eludes its predator, the predator must expend precious energy to continue the hunt elsewhere.

relationships between organisms

Predators can also be prey, depending on what part of the food chain you are looking at. For example, a trout acts as a predator when it eats insects, but it is prey when it is eaten by a bear.

It all depends on the specific details of the interaction. Ecologists use other specific names that describe what type of food a consumer eats: Omnivores eat both animals and plants. Once again, knowing the Latin root helps a lot: For example, an insectivore is a carnivore that eats insects, and a frugivore is an herbivore that eats fruit.

This may seem like a lot of terminology, but it helps scientists communicate and immediately understand a lot about a particular type of organism by using the precise terms. Not all organisms need to eat others for food and energy. Some organisms have the amazing ability to make produce their own energy-rich food molecules from sunlight and simple chemicals. Organisms that make their own food by using sunlight or chemical energy to convert simple inorganic molecules into complex, energy-rich organic molecules like glucose are called producers or autotrophs.

Some producers are chemosynthesizers using chemicals to make food rather than photosynthesizers; instead of using sunlight as the source of energy to make energy-rich molecules, these bacteria and their relatives use simple chemicals as their source of energy. Chemosynthesizers live in places with no sunlight, such as along oceanic vents at great depths on the ocean floor.

No matter how long you or a giraffe stands out in the sun, you will never be able to make food by just soaking up the sunshine; you will never be able to photosynthesize. Producers use the food that they make and the chemical energy it contains to meet their own needs for building-block molecules and energy so that they can do things such as grow, move, and reproduce.

All other life depends on the energy-rich food molecules made by producers — either directly by eating producers, or indirectly by eating organisms that have eaten producers. Not surprisingly, ecologists also have terms that describe where in the food chain a particular consumer operates.

A primary consumer eats producers e.